These are the proposals in the manifesto, listed by the ministry. You may comment on the proposals, preferably with a view to selecting something for action. If you would like this to be considered as a project for further discussion as to the exact action desired, please advise in the comment.

_

Marine Conservation Aims

1.  Create an “ecologically coherent” network of significantly large marine  reserves for all species inhabiting our seas.  Many marine species move around day by day, season by season or year by year, for food, to reproduce,  and for other reasons. Therefore it’s not enough to protect only one area when they might spend much of  their lives elsewhere. A network of marine reserves that is ecologically coherent is one that considers the  entire marine environment – not just isolated pockets – as well as the species (including all their life stages)  and habitats most needing needing protection. This ensures that...
Continue reading
  0 Comments

Wildlife Overseas Aims

1.  There will be no ambiguity in the laws relating to whaling. These  animals should not be killed or captured by any country for any  purpose, be it under the guise of science or openly for meat or  entertainment. 2.  All marine protected zones should be respected by all countries so  that boundaries set for fishermen in one country are not breached by  those from others. 3.  Loopholes in the trade of shark fin and bushmeat to be immediately  closed with a comprehensive ban on the trade in wild animal parts – be  it for food or trophies.  An EU...
Continue reading
  0 Comments

Young People in Nature Aims

1.  Every urban area to host an annual ‘Borough Bioblitz’, where children  conduct audits of their local wildlife, assessing ecological health of an area  and how to improve it.  A bioblitz is an intense period of biological surveying in an attempt to record all the living species within a  designated area. Recording is an extremely useful way to monitor population trends of various species, and  therefore help protect them. It can also help people connect with and develop an appreciation of the  wildlife on their doorstep. 2.  ‘Wild Zones’ – outdoor teaching areas – in every school, with government  funding...
Continue reading
  0 Comments

Diversity in Nature and Conservation Aims

1.  Acknowledge and address the low visible minority ethnic representation  across the environmental sector.  Racial diversity in nature and conservation organisations is a longstanding and deep-rooted problem, and  recently there have been calls from around the world to address it 4 , 5 , 6 . Gender diversity is changing slowly,  but there is still a long way to go to have balanced representation of our diverse society; an endeavour that  will not only enrich our society, but will contribute to better science, better communication, and better  communities for everyone. 2.  The sector to obtain advice from VME Race experts...
Continue reading
  0 Comments

Social Inclusion and Access to Nature Aims

1.  Recognise access to diverse nature as a human right, and reinstate that  access to all members of society.  Regular access to nature improves mental and physical health: it calms the mind, lowers blood pressure,  increases concentration, boosts self-confidence, and mediates our most human traits of emotions, meaning  and compassion. 5 , 6 Nature has forever been a universal language across cultures, and it must continue to be  freely accessible to all in our society. 2.  Voluntary full- or part-time eco-community service for all, with a small  increment on benefit payments (from universal credit to pensions) in return for  hours...
Continue reading
  0 Comments

Urban Spaces Aims

1.  Planning permission should be required for the paving, decking and  fake-turfing of more than 10% of any garden.  Private house gardens, when considered together in an urban setting, form a coherent network of green  spaces which are extremely valuable in a city. Paving, decking and fake-turfing these spaces can increase  chances of localised flooding by leaving less soil available to absorb rainwater, as well as removing  important habitat favoured by many declining species, such hedgehogs or house sparrows. 2.  Hedgehog holes should be made compulsory in all new fencing.  The hedgehog, one of the most iconic and loved animals...
Continue reading
  0 Comments

Trees Aims

1.  Every tree counts! No avoidable loss of trees other than those cultivated as  a crop. The older the tree (relative to its species or wood) the greater its  value. 2.  National and local government must have sufficient tree specialists to  safeguard, restore and expand treescapes by supporting owners and applying  regulations wisely and robustly. 3.  Make sure deterrents to prevent damage to, or loss of trees are effective  and proportionate. 4.  Give national status and recognition to ancient and other trees of special  interest, ancient woodland, wood-pasture and parkland for their historic,  landscape, wildlife and other ecosystem benefits. 5. ...
Continue reading
  0 Comments

Hedgerows and Verges Aims

1. R eplant hedgerows: we need 300,000km more to get us back to where  we were 60 years ago.  The dramatic loss of hundreds of thousands of kilometres of hedgerows has been predominantly attributed  to lack of management and the advent of modern farming practices. This has resulted in the slow  conversion of hedgerows into lines of trees and shrubs and the formation of relict hedges with large gaps  and no base, caused by careless trimming with flails 6 . 2.  60% of hedgerows currently not in ‘favourable condition’, they should  be repaired by plugging gaps, with financial support for...
Continue reading
  0 Comments

Rewilding Aims

1.  Stop using public money to fund ecological destruction.  Public money should be spent on public goods, not on funding practices or giving tax exemptions to  businesses which destroy the environment. The list is very long, but just to provide a few examples, we may  want to consider the area-based farming subsidies worth £3.6bn a year that largely go to support  unsustainable and environmental damaging activities such as: intensive sheep farming, with complete  disregard for the alarming rate of soil erosion and biodiversity loss; careless use of fertilisers, pesticides and  herbicides, subsidised by public money, polluting rivers and exterminating insect...
Continue reading
  0 Comments

Upland Ecology Aims

PROPOSALS: 1.  Downgrade all National Parks to AONBs – they are not yet worthy of the  name of National Park – and then call all these areas Upland Nature Areas  (UNAs).  The Environment Act of 1995 set out two statutory purposes for national parks in England and Wales (with  minor differences for Scotland): 1. Conserve and enhance the natural beauty, wildlife and cultural heritage.   Promote opportunities for the understanding and enjoyment of the special qualities of national parks by  the public. Furthermore, a recommendation made in 1974, known as the 'Sandford Principle', states that  "where irreconcilable conflicts exist between...
Continue reading
  0 Comments

Farming and Food Miles Aims

1.  Focus on increasing domestic fruit and vegetable production with special  support for small-scale producers.  In the face of rising uncertainties, both economical (the exit from the EU) and environmental (the changing  climate and the increase in unpredictable weather events), it is of the utmost importance that the focus is  shifted towards food production and security. The UK is currently importing over 50% of its food and feed  and is therefore heavily reliant on foreign markets. 10 This leaves Britain at the mercy of global economic  trends and environmental fluctuations. Domestic fruit and vegetable production should therefore be  increased, with...
Continue reading
  0 Comments

Pesticides Aims

1. Set target for a 50% reduction in both the weight of pesticides used and the number of pesticide applications per field by 2022. France and Denmark have recently set clear reduction targets of 50% and 40%, respectively. Many pesticides today are used in a preventative manner, rather than when indispensable to fight an existing pest problem. Therefore, by addressing challenges on a farm by farm basis and adopting innovative techniques such as new methods for mechanical weeding, it would be possible to decrease the overall deployment of chemicals in the countryside whilst maintaining similar levels of productivity. In fact,...
Continue reading
  0 Comments

Wildlife Law Aims

A new Environment Act, similar to the Human Rights Act, with the core principle that everyone, and nature itself, has the legal right to live in an environment adequate to their health and well-being. The new Act to impose a duty on public bodies and the courts to act in compatibility with it, and to enforce planetary boundaries and environmental principles - such as “polluter-pays” and sustainable  development. The new Act to include duties to restore habitats and species to favourable conservation status, to recover terrestrial, aquatic and marine ecosystems to good ecological status, and to prevent the  mistreatment of...
Continue reading
  0 Comments

Lead Ammunition Aims

Government to put the UK on the front foot by introducing a ban on the sale, possession and use of all lead ammunition across the UK. Food Standards Agency and National Health Service to undertake a public awareness campaign to promote the health risks from consumption of game shot with lead, especially to pregnant women and young children.  Individuals, NGOs and Statutory Agencies that manage land to ensure that any shooting that takes place on their land uses non-toxic ammunition. Statutory Agencies to ensure that these restrictions can be readily monitored and enforced and that penalties are appropriate, including the...
Continue reading
  0 Comments

Wildlife Crime Aims

1. All wildlife crimes should be recordable offences using official Home Office  codes. Unlike in Scotland, most wildlife crimes in England and Wales are currently recorded as ‘miscellaneous’ offences, which means they are invisible crimes in police records. This is unhelpful for determining trends and in setting strategies and priorities. A recent report​ 8 demonstrated that the perception that enhanced  recording would be an additional burden to those responsible for recording can be debunked, since existing systems would be utilised and overall efficiency would be improved. Earlier this year DEFRA’s Wildlife Minister Dr Therese Coffey claimed there was no need...
Continue reading
  0 Comments

Wildlife Welfare Aims

1.  Call an immediate halt to the badger cull.  Bovine tuberculosis (bTB) is a contagious bacterial disease of cattle, but which also affects a large number  of mammals in the UK, including badgers, deer, dogs, sheep or, as DEFRA puts it, “​ nearly all warm-blooded  animals”. ​ 9 bTB outbreaks in England have been rising since the 1980s,​ 10 posing a serious problem to the  farming industry as they are difficult to control, cost the taxpayers over £100m every year, and cause pain  and distress to the infected cattle. Since badgers are known to be implicated in the transmission of...
Continue reading
  0 Comments

Natural Culture and Education Aims

1.  Rewrite Section 78 of The Education Act to place nature at the centre  of the state curriculum from nursery to secondary school.  Section 78 of the Education Act covers the general requirements in relation to the curriculum. Currently, it  states that: “the curriculum for a [...] school satisfies the requirements of this section if it is a balanced and  broadly based curriculum which: (a) promotes the spiritual, moral, cultural, mental and physical development of pupils at the  school and of society, and  (b) prepares pupils at the school for the opportunities, responsibilities and experiences of later  life.”  A recommendation...
Continue reading
  0 Comments